Note: If these words are preceded by a couple`s sentence, they are considered singular subjects. Since a phrase like “Neither my brothers nor my father will sell the house” sounds strange, it`s probably a good idea to bring the plural subject closer to the verb whenever possible. Subjects and verbs must correspond in number (singular or plural). So, if a subject is singular, its verb must also be singular; If a subject is plural, its verb must also be plural. For example, my aunt or uncle arrives by train today. Neither Juan nor Carmen are available. Either Kiana or Casey help decorate the scene today. The example above implies that others, with the exception of Hannah, like to read comics. Therefore, plural obsedation is the right form.

Shouldn`t Joe be followed by what, not were, since Joe is singular? But Joe isn`t really there, so let`s say we weren`t there. The sentence demonstrates the subjunctive mind used to express hypothetical, desiring, imaginary, or objectively contradictory things. The subjunctive connects singular subjects to what we usually think of as a plural rush. If your sentence brings together a positive and negative subject, one in the plural and the other in the singular, the verb must correspond to the positive subject. In the first example, we express a wish, not a fact; This is why the were, which we usually consider a plural verblage, is used with the singular. (Technically, this is the singular subject of the game of objects in the subjunctive atmosphere: it was Friday.) Normally, his upbringing would seem terrible to us. However, in the second example of expressing a question, the conjunctive atmosphere is correct. Note: The subjunctive mind loses ground in spoken English, but should still be used in formal speech and writing.

4. Think of the indefinite pronoun exception that is taken into account in section 3.5, p.18: Some, arbitrary, none, all and most. The number of these words is influenced by a prepositional sentence between the subject and the verb. Verbs “Be” depending on the number and person of the subject. So far, we have examined topics that can create confusion in the subject-tilt concordance: composite subjects, subjects of group composition, subjects of singular plural importance, and indeterminate subjects. Example: the list of items is on the desktop. If you know that the list is the subject, then select is for the verb. The verb in such constructions is obvious or is.

However, the subject does not come before the verb. In this case, what form of a verb should be used? Should the verb be singular to agree with a word? Or should the verb be plural to agree with the other? Of course, group names, like other names, can also occur in plural forms (with an s). . . .